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Observing

The essential guide to astronomy
  1. Jupiter and Saturn line up level in the south earlier in the evening now, as summer proceeds. How early in twilight can you see them both? High upper left of them shines Altair.

    As night comes on, look for the Sagittarius Teapot to Jupiter's lower right.

    The post This Week's Sky at a Glance, August 14 – 22 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  2. The Perseid meteor shower is like no other. Every August it delivers up to 100 meteors an hour in pleasant weather conducive to getting outside and staying up late. What's more, most kids still aren't in school, making it possible for the entire family to enjoy the event.

    The post Perseids Peak August 11–12 — Get Ready for the Show appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  3. It's Perseid meteor week! The shower peaks on the night of August 11th, but you may see the occasional Perseid any night and perhaps already have.

    Jupiter and Saturn shine in the southeast after dark. Bright Vega passes closest to overhead around 10 or 11 p.m.

    The post This Week's Sky at a Glance, August 7 – 15 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  4. The Perseids are upon us — and as you're looking out for shooting stars, look for Jupiter and Saturn low in the southeast as soon as night begins to fall.

    The post August 2020: Planets & Perseids appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  5. Mars rises in the east around 11 p.m. daylight saving time this week, in Pisces. Watch for it to come up below the Great Square of Pegasus. By dawn Mars shines grandly high and bright in the south, a far-off bonfire in the heavens.

    In a telescope Mars grows from 14½ to 15½ arcseconds in apparent diameter, as big as it appears at some oppositions! But we're still speeding toward it along Earth's faster orbit around the Sun. Around this year's opposition in early October, Mars will be 22.6 arcseconds wide.

    The post This Week's Sky at a Glance, July 31 – August 8 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.